History Of Ashoka Emblem Of India

Ashoka Emblem 3D

3D-Ashoka Emblem

Ashoka Emblem 3D
Ashoka Emblem 3D

Ashoka Emblem

In India, Ashok Lat, preserved in the Varanasi Sarnath Museum, has been adopted as the national symbol of India. It was adopted on 26 January 1950, the day India became a republic. This symbol is a part of India’s government’s official letterhead and appears on all Indian currency.

Ashoka Emblem In Hindi

Bhaarat mein vaaraanasee saranaath sangrahaalay mein sanrakshit ashok laat ko bhaarat ke raashtreey prateek ke roop mein apanaaya gaya hai. yah 26 janavaree 1950 ko apanaaya gaya, jis din bhaarat ek ganatantr ban gaya. yah prateek bhaarat sarakaar ke aadhikaarik letarahed ka ek hissa hai aur sabhee bhaarateey mudra par bhee prakat hota hai.

Ashoka Emblem Animals

The Rampurwa is the only lion-head on the pillar, the elephant-top on the Sankisa. Of all these pillars, the Sarnath – Dharmachakra-pillar with four lions is the most magnificent, which is truly superior to all other Ashoka pillars in workmanship, elegance and lustre.

Ashoka Chakra

A chakra (wheel) is often made on many inscriptions of Emperor Ashoka. It is called Ashoka Chakra. This cycle is a symbol of “Dharmachakra”. For example, the Ashok Chakra is present on the Lion-Chaturmukh (Lion’s Kapital) and Ashoka Pillar in Sarnath. Ashoka Chakra is placed in the national flag of India.

Logo Ashoka Emblem

Ashoka Emblem Logo
Ashoka Emblem Logo

Ashok Emblem Introduction 

The Ashok Lat, preserved in the Varanasi Sarnath Museum in India, has been adopted as the national symbol of India. It was adopted on 26 January 1950, the day India became a republic. [1] This symbol is a part of India’s government’s official letterhead and appears on all Indian currency. It also serves as the national symbol of India in many places and prominently appears on the Indian passport. The Ashoka Chakra (wheel) is located in the centre of the national flag of India on its basis. The use of This Emblem is Restricted and Regulated under the State Emblem of India (Prohibition of Improper Use) Act, 2005. No person or private organization is allowed to use the symbol for official correspondence.

Ashoka Emblem PNG

Ashoka Emblem PNG
Ashoka Emblem PNG

History Of Ashoka Emblem

Ashoka’s lotus displayed in the Ashoka Pillar at Sanchi Stupa. The actual Sarnath stands behind four Asiatic lions in the regalia, a symbol of strength, courage, confidence and pride. Below is a horse and an ox, and in the centre of it is a beautiful wheel (Dharma Chakra). There is an elephant (of the east), an ox (of the west), of the horse (of the south), and of the lion (of the north), which are separated by wheels in the middle—on a lotus in full flower, exemplifying the crystalline and creative inspiration of life.

Carved from a single sandstone section, the polished capital is crowned by the wheel of law (the wheel of religion). In the symbol adopted by Madhav Sahni in 1950, only three lions are visible. The fourth is hidden from view. On the right is the bull and the horse galloping to the left, and to the extreme right and left is the outline of the Dharma Chakra. Below the abacus is carved a bell-shaped lotus. [2] Forming an integral part of the symbol is the motto written below the epigraph in the Devanagari script: Satyameva Jayate [3] This is a quotation from the Mundaka Upanishad, [4] the closing verse of the sacred Hindu Vedas.

Many Interesting Things About The National Emblem Of India

The emblem of India is taken from the Ashoka Pillar at Sarnath. The emblem has four lions, but only three of them are visible. A lion hides behind the figure. On the lower part of the emblem, the ideal sentence is written ‘Satyamev Jayate’. This motto is taken from the Mundakopanishad. The Government of India adopted the emblem on 26 January 1950.

  • Emperor Ashoka was the next king of the Maurya dynasty. His kingdom extended from the Hindu Kush into the Bay of Bengal.
  • It’s said that Ashoka took refuge with the Buddha after the Kalinga war, and he gave up the route of violence.
  • He made loyalty to existence, tolerance, compassion and calm co-existence based on his government.
  • Another factor That’s taken in the Ashoka Pillar is the Ashoka Chakra.
  • The Ashoka Chakra is observed from the federal flag. It’s a depiction of the Buddhist cycle. It’s 24 matchsticks.
  • The Ashoka Chakra can also be referred to as the wheel of responsibility. The matchsticks within it reflect the 24 qualities of a guy.
  • The actual Ashoka column has four lions. These four lions are a sign of courage, strength, pride and confidence.
  • On its side are a horse and ox. Between the horse and the bull is a wheel, i.e. that the Dharma Chakra.
  • The Ashoka Pillar has elephants around the other hand, bulls on the west side, horses on the south side and lions around the north.
  • This whole emblem is engraved on the lotus blossom form. Essentially, it’s constructed on a massive column. It’s named Lion Capital.
  • According to historians, the Ashoka Pillar was built by Emperor Ashoka in the third century.
  • The pillar had been built near Sarnath to indicate the place where Buddha gave his first sermon.

Ashoka emblem wallpaper

Ashoka emblem wallpaper
Ashoka emblem wallpaper

Question/Answer About Ashok Emblem

1. The lion capital of the Ashoka pillar founded at what is the national emblem of India?

Answer: State emblem, A dharmachakra is placed above this lion pillar made by cutting a single stone. The Government of India adopted this symbol on 26 January 1950. Only three lions are visible in this. The fourth is not visible. Embossed in the middle of the strip is the chakra, with a bull on the right and a horse on the left.

2. The Ashoka pillar whose lion capital was adopted by India as a national emblem is situated at?

Answer: The symbol of the nation is derived from the Sarnath Lion Capital of Ashoka. Originally, four lions were standing facing each other, separated by an elephant’s running horse, a bull and a lion, which came in the middle of a circle over a bell-shaped lotus.

3. Who can use the Ashoka emblem?

Answer: There is no definite rule about whether the common man can use the Ashoka Chakra and the Ashoka Pillar. But the rules for using the national emblem are described in the National Emblem Act 2007, according to which government offices and government officials can only use the national emblem only for government use. Government offices, both state and central government offices, can use it on their printing material, and officers can use it on their visiting card.

4. How many lions in the Ashoka emblem?

Answer: The emblem of India is a replica of the Lion Pillar of Ashoka at Sarnath, which is preserved in the museum of Sarnath. The original pillar has four lions at the top, which are facing each other.

5. What does our national emblem signify?

Answer: The national emblem (four lions) shows strength, courage, pride and faith, etc.

6. What is the symbol of Ashoka?

Answer: The Ashoka Chakra has been considered the ‘Dharma Chakra’ in India. This Dharma Chakra is called the ‘Chakra of Law’, taken from the Sarnath temple built by the Mauryan Emperor Ashoka in the third century BCE. The meaning of displaying this cycle is that – life is moving, and stopping means death.

7. Who uses Ashoka’s emblem?

Answer: There is no definite rule about whether the common man can use the Ashoka Chakra and the Ashoka Pillar. But the rules for using the national emblem are described in the National Emblem Act 2007, according to which government offices and government officials can only use the national emblem only for government use. Government offices, both state and central government offices, can use it on their printing material, and officers can use it on their visiting card.

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